eXTReMe Tracker
Steps:
- Drill holes.  Using a drill bit just a little wider than your rope,
drill one hole in the bottle cap, another two just under the neck of the bottle, and a fourth in the bottom of the bottle.
- Attach "buttons".  Poke a length of rope through the bottom of the bottle and out the mouth of the bottle.  Tie a knot in the rope and pull the knot back into the bottom of the bottle.  Poke the other end of the same rope through a button and knot it.   Repeat this using the other button and one of the two holes at the neck of the bottle.
- Attach the bottle cap.  Using the remaining hole at the neck of the
bottle, attach the cap as you did the buttons.
- Attach fabric.   Cut a short fringe into all the edges of the fabric to
help avoid the danger of frayed threads forming a noose.  Fold the fabric to form one or two vertical pouches, wrap it around the bottle, and secure with lengths of rope.
- Load with treats.  Fill the pouches with treats.   Make a short "daisy
chain" of treats by tying peanuts and bits of cork along a flexible string.  Stuff strips of paper towel (as filler) along with the string of treats into the bottle, leaving one end of the string at the mouth of the bottle, where the bird can get at it.
- Hang the bottle.  Push the wooden squares, as you would buttons, through the bars on the side or top of the cage.
- Sit back and watch the action!
Roger’s Foraging Fun
“I'm not sure if this is a foraging toy or a martial arts toy.  My bird will root around for the treats stuffed into the pouches on sides of the bottle, then unscrew the bottle top and drag out a string of treats, and then do battle with the dangling bottle cap”.


Materials:
- One wide mouthed plastic bottle.  Gatorade and Nesquick bottles work well.
- One yard of light rope.   I used one that is 1/4 inch thick.
- A foot of flexible string (but not thread).
- One rectangle of cloth, the thicker the better.
- Two big "buttons".  They should be narrow enough to pass easily between your cage bars, but a little less than twice as wide as the gap between the bars on the bird's cage.  I used squares of pine cut from wine boxes, with a hole drilled in the center.  Cardboard or plastic would do.
- Dry treats, some edible (peanuts in the shell, dried fruit, or crackers) and some shreadables (pieces of cork or tubes of pasta).

 
Sugar gives Foraging Fun
the beak of approval!!
More Fun Foragers Next Page
Page 20
Supplies Needed
Toy Detail Close-up
WARNING!!!!  
Some birds will chew through the ropes that attach the bottle to the cage.  To avoid unexpected falls, inspect the rope frequently and replace frayed ropes immediately.
WARNING!!!!  
Some birds will chew through the ropes that attach the bottle to the cage.  To avoid unexpected falls, inspect the rope frequently and replace frayed ropes immediately.
Page 20 2